I wish to make a compensation claim for broken foot – however my employer says I was in the wrong area of the warehouse and I cannot claim – is this correct?

Regardless of the area of the warehouse in which you were, a compensation claim for broken foot may be possible if your employer has been negligent in their duty of care. This duty of care means an employer must provide their workers with a safe environment in which to work, without fear of suffering a broken foot injury. If your employer been negligent in this duty you may be entitled to claim compensation for your injury, although this duty of care is not absolute and you may have some responsibility for your broken foot accident. To help establish liability for broken foot, you are advised to consult a personal injury lawyer at the earliest opportunity.

A compensation claim for broken foot will be possible if the relevant health and safety measures were not undertaken in the workplace. This may be the situation if – for instance – a box had fallen from a height, resulting in your broken foot injury. If safety barriers were not in place to prevent the box from falling, staff were not properly trained in safe stacking methods or if the necessary supervision was not being performed, liability for broken foot may lie with your employer for having taken shortcuts in health and safety measures. If the negligence of your employer resulted in your broken foot accident, you may be entitled to claim compensation.

However it should be remembered that this duty of care is not absolute and your compensation claim for broken foot may be reduced if you are determined to be partially liable for your accident and injury. This may be the situation if – for instance – the area in which your accident occurred was specifically cordoned off due to health and safety measures, but you ignored this warning regardless and sustained a broken foot injury. It is also possible that if immediate medical attention was not sought for your injuries, you may share some liability for broken foot if you contributed to the severity of your injuries through your lack of action. While you may be entitled to some compensation for a broken foot accident if contributory negligence is a factor, the amount of compensation to which you may be entitled can be reduced to reflect your own negligence.

It appears as though your employer may challenge their liability for broken foot. This may because they are unaware of their responsibilities, if they are trying to discourage you from making a claim or if they are correct and you are partially liable for your broken foot injury. For this reason, you are strongly urged to consult a personal injury lawyer in order to discuss the details of your broken foot accident, determine liability for your accident, establish the amount of compensation to which you may be entitled and advise on whether your claim is worth pursuing further. With professional legal representation, you are also greatly increasing the likelihood that your compensation claim for broken foot will be successful.